Notice of Regular Board Meeting

Pursuant to ORS 192.640, the Board of Directors of the Silverton Fire District will hold a regular meeting at 7:30 p.m. at the Silverton Fire District Station #1, 819 Rail Way N.E., Silverton, Oregon 97381 on August 11, 2015.

 

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Call 503-873-5328.

Notice of Regular Board Meeting

Pursuant to ORS 192.640, the Board of Directors of the Silverton Fire District will hold a regular meeting at 7:30 p.m. at the Silverton Fire District Station #8, 490 3rd St., Scotts Mills, Oregon 97375 on July 14, 2015.

 

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Call 503-873-5328.

Burn Ban in effect starting 6/12/2015

BACK YARD BURNING IS CLOSING AT MIDNIGHT TONIGHT FOR THE SEASON.

With the recent warm weather, we are seeing an increase in fire activity, for this reason, burning is being shut down early, and all residential back yard burning is will close at midnight 6/11/15.

We are still very early in the season and conditions are mimicking August.

This summer is shaping up to be the worst fire season in 30-40 years. Please do your part and be extremely careful with fire. Also dispose of smoking materials in approved containers.Burn Ban

Notice of Regular Board Meeting

Pursuant to ORS 192.640, the Board of Directors of the Silverton Fire District will hold a regular meeting at 7:30 p.m. at the Silverton Fire District Station #1, 819 Rail Way NE, Silverton, Oregon 97381 on June 9, 2015.

 

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Call 503-873-5328.

The Real Reason for Memorial Day

half staff

As we approach the holiday on May 25, 2015, I send this to you as a reminder of what Memorial Day is really about. Hint: it’s not the 3 day weekend. Everyone be safe and take a moment to remember those who have sacrificed all for our country.

 

To ensure proper respect is given, the U.S. and POW-MIA flags at all public buildings are to be raised to full staff then immediately lowered to half-staff from sunrise to noon; then raised back to full staff at noon to sunset. State flags shall be at half-staff anytime the U.S. flag is.

 

Thank you,

On behalf of the Volunteers, Career Staff and Board members, please have a safe weekend and keep the true meaning of Memorial Day in your hearts and minds.

 

Observance

In traditional observance, the flag of the United States is raised briskly to the top of the staff and then solemnly lowered to the half-staff position, where it remains only until noon. It is then raised to full-staff for the remainder of the day. The half-staff position remembers the more than one million men and women who gave their lives in service of their country. At noon, their memory is raised by the living, who resolve not to let their sacrifice be in vain, but to rise up in their stead and continue the fight for liberty and justice for all.

Section 1082 of the 1998 Defense Authorization Act adds the flying of the POW-MIA flag on all Federal and U.S. Military Installations on Memorial Day. The POW-MIA flag is to be half-staffed until noon along with the National flag.

Other traditional observances included wearing red poppies, visiting cemeteries and placing flags or flowers on the graves of our fallen heroes, and visiting memorials.

Traditional observance of Memorial Day has diminished over the years and many Americans have forgotten the meaning and traditions of the day. At many cemeteries, the graves of the fallen are increasingly ignored or neglected. Most people no longer remember the proper flag etiquette for the day. While there are towns and cities that still hold Memorial Day parades, many have not held a parade in decades.

There are a few notable exceptions. Since the late 1950s on the Thursday before Memorial Day, 1,200 soldiers of the 3rd U.S. Infantry place small American flags at each of the more than 260,000 gravestones at Arlington National Cemetery. They then patrol 24 hours a day during the weekend to ensure that each flag remains standing. In 1951, the Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts of St. Louis began placing flags on the 150,000 graves at Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery as an annual Good Turn, a practice that continues to this day. More recently, beginning in 1998, on the Saturday before the observed day for Memorial Day, the Boys Scouts and Girl Scouts place a candle at each of approximately 15,300 grave sites of soldiers buried at Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park on Marye’s Heights (the Luminaria Program). And in 2004, Washington D.C. held its first Memorial Day parade in over 60 years.

To help re-educate and remind Americans of the true meaning of Memorial Day, the “National Moment of Remembrance” resolution was passed in December 2000. It asks that at 3 p.m. local time all Americans “voluntarily and informally observe in their own way a Moment of Remembrance and respect, pausing from whatever they are doing for a moment of silence or listening to Taps.”

SILVERTON FIRE DISTRICT PASSES BOND MEASURE BY WIDE MARGIN

Silverton Fire District 2015 Bond Measure Passes

The Silverton Fire District volunteers, career staff and board members are extremely pleased with the 2015 bond measure election results. With this measure passing by a staggering 73 percentage points, it is clear to see that there is a great deal of trust placed on us from the public. Trust is the foundation of all relationships, and we appreciate the amount of trust and support that has been instilled in us by the community.

It is very nice to see that we live in a community that supports the Fire Service and we appreciate the efforts of all members of the Fire District as we provided easy to understand facts and figures to the public while inviting community input. Without the support of the members of our communities, we would not be the exceptional fire agency we are today.

The passage of this measure will provide for safer apparatus, equipment, and facilities while enhancing our operational dynamics.

The community and our members have our sincere appreciation.

Captain Ed Grambusch
Public Information Officer
Silverton Fire District

Notice of Regular Board Meeting

Pursuant to ORS 192.640, the Board of Directors of the Silverton Fire District will hold a regular meeting at 7:30 p.m. at the Silverton Fire District Station #1, 819 Rail Way NE, Silverton, Oregon 97381 on May 12, 2015. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Call 503-873-5328.

Notice of Budget Committee Meeting

A Public meeting of the Budget Committee of the Silverton Fire District, Marion and Clackamas Counties, State of Oregon, to discuss the budget for the fiscal year July 01, 2015 to June 30, 2016 will be held at 819 Rail Way NE, Silverton, Oregon. The meeting will take place on Tuesday, May 19, 2015, at 7:00 p.m.. The purpose of the meeting is to receive the budget message and to receive comment from the public on the budget.

A copy of the proposed 2015-2016 budget document may be inspected or obtained on or after May 12, 2015 at 819 Rail Way NE, Silverton, Oregon, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. This is a public meeting where deliberation of the Budget Committee will take place. Any person may appear at the meeting and discuss the proposed programs with the Budget Committee.

Notice of Regular Board Meeting

Pursuant to ORS 192.640, the Board of Directors of the Silverton Fire District will hold a regular meeting at 7:30 p.m. at the Silverton Fire District Station #8, 490 Third St., Scotts Mills, Oregon 97375 on April 14, 2015.

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Call 503-873-5328.

Notice of Board of Directors Work Session Meeting

Pursuant to ORS 192.640, the Board of Directors of the Silverton Fire District will hold a work session meeting at 12:00 Noon at the Silverton Fire Station #1, 819 Rail Way NE, Silverton, Oregon 97381 on April 7, 2015. Topics to be discussed are related to the 2015-2016 budget process and the fire chief evaluation.

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Call 503-873-5328.

Bond Measure #24-383

Silverton Fire District will place a $4.3 million bond measure before the voters on the May 19th ballot.  The bonds have a maximum maturity of 16 years.  Bond measure 24-383 funds will be used to:

 

  • Improve and repair the Fire District’s 5 stations and training facilities;
  • Purchase and equip pumper trucks;
  • Refurbish 3 existing pumper trucks;
  • Replace old and obsolete self-contained breathing apparatus; and
  • Pay bond issuance fees.

 

Voters approved a similar bond measure in 1995, which will expire at the end of this year. Should the new bond measure be approved, it will be issued after the 1995 bond matures. Tax payers are not expected to see a tax increase as the Fire District anticipates that the millage rate will remain around 28 cents per $1,000 of assessed property value.  For a home valued at $200,000, the owner will pay approximately $56 per year.

 

The decision to place the bond measure before the voters comes after careful evaluation of all aspects of the Fire District. The evaluation determined:

 

  • The current fire truck fleet exceeds industry standard useful life with an average age of 24 years old.  The oldest front line pumper truck is 44 years old.

 

  • Although fire apparatus and the facilities are well maintained, the life expectancy of the equipment and facilities has expired. The recommended age for fire apparatus is no more than 20 years and the overall firefighting technology have evolved, which requires us to change with it. The self-contained breathing apparatus is not up to current firefighter industry standards, facilities need improvements for safety and energy savings and the training facilities need safety upgrades.

 

 

A lot has changed in the twenty years since the last bond measure was approved.  Calls for service have increased by 44 percent, there is a great deal more required training, there are more volunteer firefighters with the Fire District, and there are greater demands put on our volunteer personnel and equipment.

For more information about the bond visit silvertonfire.com/2015-bond/

 

Notice of Regular Board Meeting March 10, 2015

Pursuant to ORS 192.640, the Board of Directors of the Silverton Fire District will hold a regular meeting at 7:30 p.m. at the Silverton Fire District Station #1, 819 Rail Way NE, Silverton, Oregon 97381 on March 10, 2015.
The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Call 503-873-5328.

Notice of Regular Board Meeting

February 10, 2015-819 Rail Way NE, Silverton, OR 97381—7:30 p.m.

Pursuant to ORS 192.640, the Board of Directors of the Silverton Fire District will hold a regular meeting at 7:30 p.m. at the Silverton Fire District Station #1, 819 Rail Way NE, Silverton, Oregon 97381 on February 10, 2015.

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Call 503-873-5328

Notice of Board Work Session Meeting

Board of Directors of the Silverton Fire District

February 3, 2015–819 Rail Way NE, Silverton, OR 97381—12:00 Noon

Pursuant to ORS 192.640, the Board of Directors of the Silverton Fire District will hold a work session meeting at 12:00 Noon at the Silverton Fire Station #1, 819 Rail Way NE, Silverton, Oregon 97381 on February 3, 2015. The purpose of this work session is to continue the discussion on placing a bond measure on the May 19, 2015 ballot to finance the cost of apparatus, equipment, facility repairs and improvements.

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Call 503-873-5328.

Notice of Board Work Session

Pursuant to ORS 192.640, the Board of Directors of the Silverton Fire District will hold a work session meeting at 12:00 Noon at the Silverton Fire Station #1, 819 Rail Way NE, Silverton, Oregon 97381 on December 9, 2014, to continue the discussion on apparatus, equipment, and facility needs and improvements. There will also be additional discussion on bringing a bond measure to a vote of the people in the future.

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Call 503-873-5328.

Notice of Regular Board Meeting

Pursuant to ORS 192.640, the Board of Directors of the Silverton Fire District will hold a regular board meeting at 2:00 p.m. at the Silverton Fire District Station #1, 819 Rail Way NE, Silverton, Oregon 97381 on December 9, 2014, .

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Call 503-873-5328.

The Holiday Season is upon us

With the Holiday Season upon us it is a good time to remind everyone of the importance of Holiday Fire Safety.  Below are some tips from the Office of the Oregon State Fire Marshal.  When decorating your homes this Holiday Season please keep these tips in mind;

From 2008 through 2012, Oregon fires related to Christmas trees and decorations resulting in 107
fires, one death and more than $2.3 million in property loss. Candle-related fires during this same
period caused even more damage. From 2008 through 2012, there were 325 candle-related fires in
Oregon causing four deaths, 49 injuries, and more than $9.3 million in property loss.
Tree care and decorating tips:

 Choose a fresh, healthy tree with a deep-green color and flexible needles.

 When you get the tree home, cut off the bottom two inches of the trunk. This creates a
fresh, raw cut for the tree to soak up water.

 Water your tree daily. A tree may consume between a quart and a gallon of water per day.

 Place the tree at least three feet away from any heat source such as a fireplace,
woodstove, space heater, heating vent, or radiator.

 Keep lighted candles away from the tree.

 Use only noncombustible or flame resistant materials to trim a tree.

 Always unplug tree lights before leaving home or going to bed.

 If using a woodstove or fireplace, keep it screened at all times. Keep ribbons, boughs, and
other decorative materials at least three feet away.

 After the holiday season or whenever your tree dries out promptly dispose of it and
other dry greenery. Burning a tree in a stove or fireplace is extremely dangerous; proper
disposal includes recycling or pick-up by a disposal service.

 Maintain your holiday lights. Inspect holiday lights each year for frayed wires, bare spots,
and broken or cracked sockets.

 Do not overload electrical sockets. Do not link more than three light strands, unless the
directions indicate it is safe.
Candle safety

 Consider using battery-operated flameless candles, which can look and smell like real
candles.

 Never leave a burning candle unattended. Extinguish candles when you go to bed, leave a
room, or before leaving the house.

 Keep candles at least 12 inches away from anything that can burn. Keep candles at least one
foot from combustibles including clothing, curtains, upholstered furniture, greenery, and
decorations.

 Always use a sturdy non-combustible (metal, glass, or ceramic) candleholder. If a sturdy
non-combustible candle holder is not available, the candle can be placed on a non-combustible
plate.

 Place candles out of reach of small children and pets.

 Avoid candles with items embedded in them such as twigs, flowers, or leaves. These items
can ignite or even explode.

 Always use a flashlight – not a candle – for emergency lighting.
General fire safety

 Make sure you have working smoke alarms on every level of your home, outside each sleeping
area, and in each bedroom.

 Make a home fire escape plan and practice it with the whole family.

 Keep escape routes clear of clutter so you can escape quickly in case of fire.

Notice of Regular Board Meeting

Pursuant to ORS 192.640, the Board of Directors of the Silverton Fire District will hold a regular meeting at 7:30 p.m. at the Silverton Fire District Station #1, 819 Rail Way NE, Silverton, Oregon 97381 on November 11, 2014, 7:30 P.M.
The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Call 503-873-5328.

Notice of Board Work Session

Pursuant to ORS 192.640, the Board of Directors of the Silverton Fire District will hold a work session meeting at 6:00 PM at the Silverton Fire Station #1, 819 Rail Way NE, Silverton, Oregon 97381 on November 11, 2014, to discuss apparatus, equipment, and facility needs and improvements.
The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Call 503-873-5328.

Trick-or-Treating Safety Tips

As you go out tonight to go Trick-or-Treating we would like to pass on a few safety tips to keep you and your children safe.

To be able to see better, use make-up instead of a full face mask

Trick-or-Treat in a group of 4 or 5.  Take along a trusted adult with a flashlight.

Choose a safe, well-lit path in your own neighborhood.

Put reflective tape on all bags and costumes.

Costumes should be flame-resistant made os light or bright-colored material, and short enough to not trip children.

Look both ways before crossing the street and always watch for traffic.

Walk!  Never run across yards.  Use sidewalks when possible.

Only go to homes of people you know and who have porch lights on.

By following the suggestions above we will all have a Happy Halloween.Happy Halloween

Silverton Fire is now on Social Media

Silverton Fire District now is on Social Media.  We will be updating information about what is happening throughout the District on our Social Media feeds.  Things that will be on our feeds; Preparedness (how to prepare your home, family and vehicle for weather), Response (some of the calls we are going to and updates) and Mitigation (how the District is responding to a disaster).  click on the links below to follow us;

Facebook

Twitter

Notice of Regular Board Meeting

Notice of Regular Meeting October 14, 2014-490 Third Street, Scotts Mills, OR 97375—7:30 p.m.

Pursuant to ORS 192.640, the Board of Directors of the Silverton Fire District will hold a regular meeting at 7:30 p.m. at the Scotts Mills Fire Station #8, 490 Third Street, Scotts Mills, Oregon 97375 on October 14, 2014, .

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Call 503-873-5328.

Notice of Board of Directors Work Session

Pursuant to ORS 192.640, the Board of Directors of the Silverton Fire District will hold a work session meeting at 12:00 noon at the Silverton Fire Station #1, 819 Rail Way NE, Silverton, Oregon 97381 on October 6, 2014, to discuss apparatus, equipment, and facility needs and improvements.
The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Call 503-873-5328.

Silverton Fire Town Hall Meeting

On October 7, from 7PM to 9PM, the Silverton Fire District will be conducting a Town Hall meeting to discuss the expiration of the bond that the voters approved in 1995.  The last payment on the bond will be December 2015.  The goal of this meeting is to get public feedback on the direction the district should take in the future.

Silverton Fire Open House

On October 11, from 10AM-2PM the Silverton Fire District is opening it’s doors for everyone to come and see what we do.  During the open house we will have station tours, tours of the fire engines, live demonstrations and an opportunity to meet the volunteers that serve your community.

The live demonstrations will include but not limited to; how to operate a fire extinguisher, checking smoke alarms and others.  We will also be serving hot dogs throughout the event.

Fall 2014 open house

Wildfire: It’s not if, but when

Sept. 16, 2014

News contact:

Matt Flock
Community Wildfire Forester
Oregon Dept. of Forestry

This fire season has shown to be a long and grueling one. Stretching across the state from Klamath Falls to La Grande to Veneta, it started early and seems not to have an end in sight yet. Defensible space around your home is the critical piece to improve the survivability of your home in the event of a wildfire, and there is still time to create it this fire season.

“Creating defensible space around your home is the best way to make your home more survivable in the wake of a wildfire,” says Oregon Department of Forestry’s Matt Flock. “The more you can do to make your home defensible now, will be critical if a wildfire hits your community and you’re not home.”

When a wildfire starts, there is little to no warning. Defensible space is the way to prepare our homes and property to have a fighting chance in the wildland-urban interface (WUI), said the Community Wildfire Forester.

During a wildfire, firefighters work intensely to prepare homes in the path of a wildfire. The more that landowners can accomplish before the incident happens, the less time firefighters will need to spend preparing the homes and can focus instead on stopping the fire.

“It’s the little things you can do that play a key role in keeping your home, family and community safe,” he said.

Wildfires that occur in the WUI often are started by human activity and then spread to the forest. Corvallis recently had an 86-acre fire on the north side of town that threatened many homes. For residents, it was a sobering moment of what fire can do and how real it can become to communities near wooded areas.

Once underway a fire follows the fuel, whether it is trees or houses. Creating defensible space around a house is a proven way to make it less vulnerable to wildfire. The National Firewise Communities Program has great tips for WUI residents to refer to. The program says “Defensible space” simply means to:
  • Maintain the landscape around a home to reduce fire danger.
  • Provide safe access to firefighters so they can protect it.

To create defensible space, Firewise advises to start with the house and work your way out:

Check the roof and rain gutters

Leaves and needles in gutters are very susceptible to the ember showers that commonly occur at the head of a raging wildfire. Cleaning that material out from the gutters and off the roof of your home will make it much more difficult for a fire to start there.

Remove fuel sources close to the house

The perimeter of the home and attachments out to about five feet are vulnerable if organic mulch, arborvitae or other flammable plants are located in that area. A wind-cast ember or a creeping ground fire could ignite fuels in this zone and carry flames to the structure.
Maintain landscaping in the middle zone
Plants in the zone about 30 to 100 feet from the house should be low-growing and well irrigated. Firewise advises to:
  • Leave 30 feet between clusters of two to three trees, or 20 feet between individual trees.
  • Encourage a mixture of deciduous and coniferous trees.
  • Create fuel breaks, such as driveways, gravel walkways and lawns.
  • Prune trees up six to 10 feet from the ground.

Pruning trees in this way inhibits a wildfire from climbing into the crowns and carrying flames from tree to tree, and eventually to the house. Doing that allows the fire to stay on the ground where firefighters can fight the fire and keep its spread to a minimum.

Outer Zone

The zone 100 to 200 feet from the home requires less attention but still should be looked at for ways to create an outer buffer to wildfire. Trees may need to be thinned, though less intensively than those closer in.
  • Remove any heavy accumulations of woody debris.
  • Thin out clusters of small trees and remove ladder fuels that can climb into tree canopies.
  • Reduce the density of tall trees so canopies are not touching.

Homeowner / Firefighter access

Prune trees along the driveway and trim back shrubs so that the egress to leave your home is not blocked by intense fire behavior. Firefighter will need to use that same road to get into your home as well. Keeping it trimmed and open allows them to do their job and attack the fire as well.

More tips on how to create defensible space around your home and protect it from wildfire can be found at: www.firewise.org.

###

ODF Forest Close Down Order

Due to the High temperatures, low fuel moisture, low relative humidity and the winds the Oregon Department of Forestry has changed the Industrial Fire Protection Level (IFPL) to level 3.  Please see the attached document for specific details.  Please be safe when you are out in the woods and driving around.  If you see smoke do not hesitate to call 911 to report it.  Keep in mind that this Closure order is for Industrial uses in the forest.  If you plan on going into the forest please check the Forest office for any recreational closures that may be in effect.  IFPLNC0414

Extreme Fire Danger

With the hot and dry weather we are currently experiencing please keep in mind to be extra careful with flames and spark emitting devices.  Also be careful when discarding smoking materials.  If you are going out in the woods this weekend check the fire restrictions where you are going.  If you have a campfire make sure that it is always attended and cold-dead-out before you leave it.   With how hot, dry and windy it is, it will only take a small spark to start a large fire.

Also as a reminder make sure that your pets have a shady area for them to stay during the hottest times of day as well as plenty of water to drink.  Animals and small children should never be left in a car even for a short trip into a store.  it only takes a minute or two for the temperatures in the vehicle to become life threatening to the animal or child.

Board of Directors’ Work Session

Notice of Work Session Meeting of the Board of Directors of the Silverton Fire District September 3, 2014–819 Rail Way NE, Silverton, OR 97381—12:00 Noon    Pursuant to ORS 192.640, the Board of Directors of the Silverton Fire District will hold a work session meeting at 12:00 noon at the Silverton Fire Station #1, 819 Rail Way NE, Silverton, Oregon 97381 on September 3, 2014, to discuss apparatus, equipment, and facility needs and improvements.

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Call 503-873-5328.

 

Drownings can be prevented

One near drowning of a child and one drowning fatality of an adult at the same park in the Silverton Fire District all within two weeks should raise some red flags. Swimming is a fun and healthy activity, but it can be dangerous.

Every year the Silverton Fire District responds to water fatalities, near fatalities and water rescues. Most, if not all, of these tragedies can be avoided by following some very easy tips provided by the American Red Cross:

1) Swim in designated areas supervised by lifeguards.
2) Always swim with a buddy; do not allow anyone to swim alone.
3) Never leave a young child unattended near water and do not trust a child’s life to another child; teach children to always ask permission to go near water.
4) Have young children or inexperienced swimmers wear U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jackets around water, but do not rely on life jackets alone.
5) Maintain constant supervision.
6) Make sure everyone in your family learns to swim well.
7) If you have a pool, secure it with appropriate barriers. Many children who drown in home pools were out of sight for less than five minutes and in the care of one or both parents at the time.
8) Avoid distractions when supervising children around water.
9) If a child is missing, check the water first. Seconds count in preventing death or disability.
10) Have appropriate equipment, such as reaching or throwing equipment, a cell phone, life jackets and a first aid kit.
11) Enroll in Red Cross home pool safety, water safety, first aid and CPR/AED courses to learn how to prevent and respond to emergencies.
12) Drink plenty of water regularly, even if you’re not thirsty. Avoid drinks with alcohol or caffeine in them.

Knowing how to swim is the first line of defense in the water and making sure that your family and you know how to swim well can keep water tragedies from becoming a reality. However, it is important to understand that even the strongest swimmers can easily become tired in the water very quickly especially after drinking alcohol and eating heavy meals. Know what your own limitations are and listen to what your body is telling you; if you realize that you are becoming fatigued, get out of the water and take a rest.

The Silverton Fire District would like everyone to stay safe in and around the water. By doing your part, you can help prevent these yearly tragedies that affect so many lives.

Protect your home from wildfire

Check out the bottom of this article for links to more information about how to protect your home from a possible approaching wildfire.

Every year the Silverton Fire District responds to numerous wildfires in fields or in heavy timber in our response area. Many of these fires threaten near-by homes and other structures. Home owners have a responsibility to ensure that they take measures to keep their home is safe during a wildfire situation.

Some of the more prominent problems in this area are access issues, flammables being stored to close to the home, tree limbs overhanging the home, and not having a 30 foot or larger fire break around the home.

Having a 30 foot fire break around the home is extremely important. Fire breaks consist of low growing bushes kept away from the home, green grass that is kept short and well watered, and keeping dry debris cleared from the area. Fire breaks give firefighters a much better chance at saving a home than those that do not have a fire break. It is also a very important element in keeping the home safe if firefighters are not available to defend the home. All flammables, including wood piles and other debris, should be in a sheltered area well away from the home.

It is preferred to have large trees away from homes. However, if homeowners choose to keep them in close proximity, limbs should not be allowed to hang over portions of the home. Trees that catch fire can commonly “crown” which means that the limbs higher up become involved in fire. When this happens, there is a massive amount of fire, heat, and embers that are produced within seconds.

Home owners should also make sure that their driveway is well marked with their address and that tree limbs and brush along the side of the driveway will not interfere with emergency vehicles having access to the home. Home owners should keep in mind that emergency vehicles are larger and require more room when trying to get to a residence.

The following are some tips for protecting a home from wildfire:

1. Roofing is made of non-combustible materials.

2. Trees have been trimmed away from the roof.

3. Use landscaping plants that are low growing and less flammable.

4. Flammables are stored away from the home.

5. Yard is well trimmed and free of debris.

6. The roof and gutters should be cleaned of leaves, pine needles, and other debris.

7. A 30 foot non-combustible fire break surrounds the home.

8. An adequate water supply is available to fight fire.

9. Good access is provided for emergency vehicles.

10. Exterior walls are made of fire resistant materials.

Links:

Keep Oregon Green

Firewise Communities

Below is a PSA from the AD Council about wildfire preparedness and prevention.

Keep it Legal, Keep it Safe

FIREWORKS – KEEP IT LEGAL, KEEP IT SAFE

News Release from Oregon State Fire Marshal
Posted on FlashAlert: June 23rd, 2014 12:03 PM

The Office of State Fire Marshal (OSFM), Oregon fire service, Keep Oregon Green, natural resource agencies, Oregon fireworks wholesalers, and safety experts encourage Oregonians to “Keep it Legal and Keep it Safe” when using fireworks. The 2014 Oregon fireworks sales season opens Monday, June 23 and runs through Sunday, July 6. The OSFM and their partners want everyone to know what fireworks are legal in Oregon, where they are permitted, and the important steps to take for fireworks safety.

“People often forget that legal fireworks can only be purchased from Oregon permitted fireworks retailers and stands,” says Interim State Fire Marshal Jim Walker. “And, regulations limit where those fireworks may be used. For example, fireworks are prohibited on all Oregon beaches, in parks, and campgrounds.”

July 4th holiday forest visitors are advised to leave all fireworks at home. The use of fireworks is prohibited on all national forestland, and most other public lands. “Fireworks compound the threat to already dry forests,” states Keep Oregon Green President Kristin Babbs. “Enjoy fireworks where they belong: on the pavement- away from houses, vehicles, and flammable vegetation.”

Oregon law bans possession, use, or sale of fireworks that fly, explode, or travel more than six feet on the ground or 12 inches into the air. Fireworks commonly called bottle rockets, Roman Candles, and firecrackers are ILLEGAL in Oregon.

There were 197 reported fireworks-related fires in Oregon during 2013, resulting in one death, 38 injuries and more than $775,000 in property damage. Over the past five years, from 2009 through 2013, there were 905 reported fireworks-related fires in Oregon resulting in one death, 150 civilian injuries, and more than $4.4 million in property damage.

Under Oregon law, officials may seize illegal fireworks and fine offenders up to $500 per violation. Those who misuse fireworks or allow fireworks to cause damage are liable and may be required to pay fire suppression costs or other damage. Parents are also liable for fireworks damage caused by their children.

“All Oregonians share the responsibility to use only legal fireworks and use them carefully,” adds Walker. And we encourage you to be aware and considerate of neighbors and their pets, before deciding on when and where you choose to light fireworks.”

The OSFM encourages everyone to use the four B’s of safe fireworks use:
* Be Prepared before lighting fireworks: keep water available by using a garden hose or bucket.
* Be Safe when lighting fireworks: keep children and pets away from fireworks.
* Be Responsible after lighting fireworks: never relight a dud. Wait 15 to 20 minutes then soak it in a bucket of water before disposal.
* Be Aware: use only legal fireworks and use them only in legal places.

The four B’s of fireworks safety brochure is available here:
http://www.oregon.gov/OSP/SFM/docs/Licensing_permits/fireworks/4BesFireworks.pdf.
Tips in Spanish are also available at: http://www.oregon.gov/OSP/SFM/docs/Licensing_permits/fireworks/Fireworks_4Bs_Spanish.pdf.

More fireworks information is available at:
http://www.oregon.gov/OSP/SFM/Licensing_Fireworks_Home.shtml

Backyard Burning Season

As we are coming to the end of Spring and Summer is just around the corner. We would like to remind you that the backyard burning season will be closing on June 15th. Until then please remember to call the Burn Information line at 1-877-982-0011 before lighting the fire. As always please remember to have a shovel and charged garden hose handy near the fire to help control the fire.

Notice of Budget Committee Meeting

A Public meeting of the Budget Committee of the Silverton Fire District, Marion and Clackamas Counties, State of Oregon, to discuss the budget for the fiscal year July 01, 2014 to June 30, 2015 will be held at 819 Rail Way NE, Silverton, Oregon. The meeting will take place on Tuesday, May 20, 2014, at 7:00 p.m.. The purpose of the meeting is to receive the budget message and to receive comment from the public on the budget.

A copy of the proposed 2014-2015 budget document may be inspected or obtained on or after May 13, 2014 at 819 Rail Way NE, Silverton, Oregon, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. This is a public meeting where deliberation of the Budget Committee will take place. Any person may appear at the meeting and discuss the proposed programs with the Budget Committee.

Backyard Burning is now allowed

Backyard Burning Season is now open.  Please call the burn information line at 1-877-982-0011 prior to lighting your fire to verify that it is a burn day.

Fires must be attended until the fire is completely burned out or extinguished

Keep the space around the burn area clear (3 feet of non-combustible materials)

Do not locate the fire under overhead lines, overhanging trees, near fences or structures

Always have a hand tool and/or water at the burn area to control the fire.

For more information on backyard burning check out the Burning Information page.

2014 Annual Awards Banquet

On Saturday February 15, the Silverton Fire District held its annual awards banquet.

During the Banquet the following people/companies received awards;

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Captain Harry Klopfenstien was awarded Life Membership to the Fire District for 25 dedicated years to the District.

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Captain Allan Mann was awarded Officer of the Year

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Support Services and Duty Officer companies received company of the year. (photos to come.)

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FF Max Hughes was awarded Rookie of the Year

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FF/EMT-I Sarah Smith was awarded Medic of the Year

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FF Ray Dandeneau was awarded Firefighter of the Year

The following members were awarded the Excellence in Service Award for going above and beyond the call of duty.

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Lt. Steve Baker    FF Ray Dandeneau   FF Bernie Palmer        Support Member Jon Lieuallen

Holiday Fire Safety Tips

With the holiday season in full swing, State Fire Marshal Mark Wallace cautions everyone to keep fire safety in mind when decorating and entertaining.

“This season is a busy and exciting time of year, but don’t let that distract you from keeping your family and friends safe from fire,” says Wallace. “By following a few important safety tips for Christmas trees, decorations, and candles, you can help ensure your holidays remain happy.”

From 2008 through 2012, Oregon fires related to Christmas trees and decorations resulting in 107 fires, one death and more than $2.3 million in property loss. Candle-related fires during this same period caused even more damage. From 2008 through 2012, there were 325 candle-related fires in Oregon causing four deaths, 49 injuries, and more than $9.3 million in property loss.

Tree care and decorating tips:
* Choose a fresh, healthy tree with a deep-green color and flexible needles.
* When you get the tree home, cut off the bottom two inches of the trunk. This creates a fresh, raw cut for the tree to soak up water.
* Water your tree daily.  A tree may consume between a quart and a gallon of water per day.
* Place the tree at least three feet away from any heat source such as a fireplace, woodstove, space heater, heating vent, or radiator.
* Keep lighted candles away from the tree.
* Use only noncombustible or flame resistant materials to trim a tree.
* Always unplug tree lights before leaving home or going to bed.
* If using a woodstove or fireplace, keep it screened at all times. Keep ribbons, boughs, and other decorative materials at least three feet away.
* After the holiday season or whenever your tree dries out promptly dispose of it and other dry greenery. Burning a tree in a stove or fireplace is extremely dangerous; proper disposal includes recycling or pick-up by a disposal service.
* Maintain your holiday lights. Inspect holiday lights each year for frayed wires, bare spots, and broken or cracked sockets.
* Do not overload electrical sockets. Do not link more than three light strands, unless the directions indicate it is safe.

Candle safety
* Consider using battery-operated flameless candles, which can look and smell like real candles.
* Never leave a burning candle unattended. Extinguish candles when you go to bed, leave a room, or before leaving the house.
* Keep candles at least 12 inches away from anything that can burn. Keep candles at least one foot from combustibles including clothing, curtains, upholstered furniture, greenery, and decorations.
* Always use a sturdy non-combustible (metal, glass, or ceramic) candleholder. If a sturdy non-combustible candle holder is not available, the candle can be placed on a non-combustible plate.
* Place candles out of reach of small children and pets.
* Avoid candles with items embedded in them such as twigs, flowers, or leaves. These items can ignite or even explode.
* Always use a flashlight – not a candle – for emergency lighting.

General fire safety
* Make sure you have working smoke alarms on every level of your home, outside each sleeping area, and in each bedroom.
* Make a home fire escape plan and practice it with the whole family.
* Keep escape routes clear of clutter so you can escape quickly in case of fire.

For more information on fire safety visit: http://www.oregon.gov/osp/SFM/pages/commed_firesafety_program.aspx

13th Annual Food and Toy Drive

This coming Saturday December 7 and Sunday December 8 members of the Silverton Fire District as well as other local groups will be going door-to-door asking for donations of non-perishable food and new unwrapped toys.  We will start going around town around 8 AM on Saturday and around 10 AM on Sunday.  If you would like, please place the items you wish to donate on your front steps and we will pick them up.

If you for some reason we miss you or if you are not home when we come by there are barrels placed all throughout town at the businesses listed below.  You can also contact our business office at 503-873-5328, Monday-Friday 8 Am – 5 PM to make arrangements for someone to come pick up your items you wish to donate.

All of the donations will remain here in our own community.  All of the food donations will be given to SACA, Silverton Area Community Aid, and the toys will be given to the Zenith Womens Club.

Christmas barrels for food and toys have been set up at the following locations:

  • Hi School Pharmacy
  • Figaro’s Pizza
  • Les Schwab Tire Center
  • Rite Aid
  • Roth’s Family Market
  • Dr. Michael Kim DDS
  • Silverton Self Defense
  • Papa Murphy’s Pizza
  • Silver Creek Lanes
  • McDonalds
  • Larsen and Flynn Insurance
  • Silverton Elks Lodge
  • Outlaw Steel and Design
  • Silverton Green Store
  • Apples and Oranges
  • Silver Falls Pawn Shop
  • Postal Connections
  • Silverton NAPA
  • Whimsey
  • Water Mountain Restaurant
  • Gallon House Bar
  • Chase Bank
  • Los Girasoles
  • Silverton Coffee Station
  • Mocha Delight
  • Silverton Fitness
  • The Palace Theater
  • Dr. Alan Carter DMD
  • Happy Jing Restaurant
  • Ixtapa Mexican Restaurant
  • Subway
  • Dairy Queen
  • MAPS Credit Union
  • Willamette Valley Bank
  • Silver Falls Family Dental
  • American Family Video
  • AmeriTitle
  • Silver Creek Coffee House
  • NW Oregon Reality Group
  • Thai Dish
  • Seven Brides Brewery
  • Dr. Michael Bliss Family Dentistry

Home Heating Safety Tips

As cooler weather arrives, State Fire Marshal Mark Wallace is urging Oregonians to use heating appliances wisely.

“With the onset of cooler weather, I urge citizens to ensure all their heating appliances are in good working order,” says Wallace.  Have your woodstoves, fireplaces, chimneys, cleaned and inspected by a qualified specialist before using them. Portable space heaters also pose a high risk. Use these with extreme caution and follow our space heater safety tips.”

Although woodstove and fireplace-related fires are more common, the most deadly home heating fires result from misuse of portable electric heaters.

From 2008 through 2012 in Oregon, there were 1,961 home heating-related fires resulting in nine deaths, 56 injuries, and more than $26.9 million in property loss. Six of the nine fatalities occurred in portable heater-related fires.

Oregonians can keep themselves safer from heating-related fires using these safety tips:

Portable Space Heaters

  • When using portable heaters make sure they come with an automatic tip-over switch and a high-temperature limit switch. The tip-over switch turns the heater off if it is knocked over. A high-temperature limit switch prevents the heater from overheating.
  • Give heaters space. Keep at least three feet of space between the heater and combustibles such as furniture, curtains, blankets, papers, and people.
  • Check heater electrical cords. Inspect for cracked or damaged cords, broken plugs, or loose connections. Replace before using the space heater.
  • Never use an extension cord or power strip with a portable electric heater. It can overload the circuit and cause a fire.
  • Never allow children to play with, or around the heater.
  • Unplug heaters when not in use, before going to bed, or when leaving the room.

Electric Baseboard and Wall Heaters

  • Be aware of electric baseboard and wall heaters. These heaters are thermostatically controlled and may turn on without warning when temperatures drop.
  • Give heaters space. Just as with portable space heaters, keep at least three feet of space between your baseboard/wall heater and combustibles items such as furniture, curtains, blankets, papers, and people.

Fuel Burning Space Heaters

  • If using a fuel burning space heater, make sure it is designed for indoor use. Read all manufacturer instructions and ensure it is properly vented.
  • Allow the heater to cool before refueling. Refuel outside or in a well-ventilated area.
  • If you smell gas, do not operate any switches, appliances, or thermostats. Leave the building and call 9-1-1, the fire department, or the gas company.

Fireplaces and Woodstoves

  • Have chimney and woodstove flues and vents inspected and cleaned every year by a qualified chimney specialist. Ask them to check for creosote deposits, soot build-up, or physical damage.
  • Always use a fireplace screen. Make sure the screen is made of sturdy metal or heat- tempered glass to prevent sparks from escaping.
  • Keep a clutter-free environment. Clear the area around the hearth of debris, decorations, and flammable materials.
  • Store kindling, fire logs, and wood at least three feet from any heat source.
  • Install stovepipe thermometers to help monitor flue and chimney temperatures.
  • Use proper fire starters. Proper fire starters include newspaper, kindling, or specially manufactured starters designed for indoor use. Never use flammable liquid, such as lighter fluid, kerosene, or gasoline to start a fire.
  • Never burn charcoal indoors. Burning charcoal can release lethal amounts of carbon monoxide.
  • Use fire-resistant materials on walls around woodstoves.
  • Allow fireplace and woodstove ashes to cool before disposing of them.
  • Dispose of ashes in a tightly covered metal container and place the container outdoors, at least ten feet from the home and any other nearby buildings. Ashes may retain heat for days after they appear out.

Smoke Alarms and Home Escape Plans

  • Make sure you have working smoke alarms on every level of your home, outside each sleeping area, and in each bedroom.
  • Push the test button to be sure the battery is working.
  • Follow manufacturer’s instructions on regularly cleaning your alarms of dust and cobwebs.
  • Replace any smoke alarm that is 10 years old or older.
  • Make a home escape plan and practice it with your family at least twice a year.

Carbon Monoxide Dangers

  • Make sure your home has a working carbon monoxide alarm in a central location outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home.
  • Home heating and cooking equipment that burn fuels such as gasoline, wood, coal, natural gas, propane, oil and methane are sources of carbon monoxide.
  • Carbon monoxide poisoning can be fatal if not detected early.
  • Test and maintain your carbon monoxide alarms according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

For more home fire safety tips, visit:

http://www.oregon.gov/osp/SFM/pages/commed_firesafety_program.aspx.

For more smoke alarm information, visit:

http://www.oregon.gov/OSP/SFM/CommEd_SA_Program.shtml.

For more information on carbon monoxide and Oregon’s carbon monoxide law, visit:

http://www.oregon.gov/OSP/SFM/CommEd_CO_Program.shtml.

 

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Time to change your clocks, time to check your smoke alarms

Don’t forget to set your clocks back 1 hour before you go to bed this Saturday night.  With the time change this weekend, it is a good time to remember to check your smoke alarms and carbon monoxide alarm batteries.    If you are having issues with your smoke alarms you can call the Fire District, business hours 503-873-5328, and we will send someone out to talk a look at it and possibly install a new one for you.

Remember working smoke and carbon monoxide alarms save lives.

Smoke Alarm

Portland Stair Climb

This last weekend there were 3 members of the Silverton Fire District that participated in the Portland Stair Climb for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.  The members were JoAnn Tyler, Josh Wimp and Deb Conner.  We are very proud of  Deb Conner for finishing 12th overall in the female division.

The Stair climb takes place in the US Bank tower in downtown Portland.  It consists of climbing 40 flights of stairs in full structural firefighting gear including air packs.  The participants were only able to breathe the air that they carried on their back.

Congratulations and thank you all for your hard work and dedication.

The Challenge

From Left to Right: JoAnn Tyler, Deb Conner, Josh Wimp
From Left to Right:
JoAnn Tyler, Deb Conner, Josh Wimp

Volunteers Needed

We are currently looking for Volunteers to help our community.  Currently are Volunteer numbers are low for the Crooked Finger Station, Scotts Mills Station and Victor Point Station.  If you live by one of these stations please consider becoming a Volunteer.

Take a look at our Volunteer page to see what positions are available.  Not all Volunteers have to fight fires there are several non-firefighter positions available.

The recruit academy starts in January.  Applications are currently available at the Silverton Main Station and available on-line.  You can also contact our Recruiter with questions or to schedule a time to discuss the volunteer opportunities.

Fire District Recruiter
Rick Heuchert
503-873-5328
rickheuchert@silvertonfire.com